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September 25, 2007

Comments

Rory L. Aronsky

Wow. I'm so stunned, I'm just going to sit here silent and stunned. That's pure genius I can't even hope to achieve.

Mr. Hollywood

Superb piece of creative writing Ken ... and what's sad is what passes for creativity today ... dreck! How I long for those great "Golden Years" of fine shows AND fine writing!

Anonymous

I miss those innocent earlier sitcoms when June Cleaver would chastise her husband for being too hard on the Beaver.And Ralph would hold up a fist to show how he take his wife to the moon with a pow!WK

emily litella

Superb bit and brilliant concept, Ken!Tag with: More great comedy from the network that brings you the news stylings of Katie Couric...

LAprGuy

Sue Ann Niven's dialogue would be straight out of "Sex and the City."

FredCDobbs

Sorry Ken, those jokes are funny!

Anonymous

"Nice" disappeared when cable bloomed. Vicious competition pushed the limits. We're left with no barriers, and taste was redefinedAll of this makes writing and selling character comedy tougher, I bet.

benson

Just watched the second installment of "Back to You", and while it was funny at times, there was a heaping helping of the borderline raunchy humor referenced in Ken's piece.And this from people whose names previously were associated with "classy" comedies.One other note about Back to You-does this show have enough Executive Producers? I think I saw eight people credited tonight.

Anonymous

Ditto on tonight's "Back to You." The orange business wasn't funny enough to justify the blueish humor (and some of my best friends are...); and the goldfish gag was, at best, tired.Second episode and the show's already on its way downhill.

Patti S

Very accurate, Ken! I'm a 50-something gal who's an original fan of all those shows. Today, I'm having trouble fathoming that two comedies I enjoy are ANIMATED! (The Simpsons & Family Guy) What a world!

Anonymous

Kudos, my man.You finally made it up on Defamer.Can't wait for the teleconference.-Disappointed M's Fan In Seattle

Steve

Great, Ken but compared to the reality of sitcoms today, yours were still pretty tame.

jbryant

Missed the Back to You pilot, but after seeing episode 2, I don't feel so bad about it. The risque stuff was too predictable to be funny (anyone else say the punch lines in unison with the actors?). One can't help but admire the skills of Grammer, Heaton and Willard, but they can only do so much. I quite enjoyed Ty Burrell's physical shtick though.

benson

I don't know if anyone comes back to the comments section after the day of posting, but here's goes with a question:Are the producers and writers of Back to You tailoring the show to Fox's "standards"? Would the show have less predictable sex jokes if it were on a different network? The cynic in me says no, but I'm not in the TV biz.

Anonymous

The 1972 Saturday night lineup on CBS was classic. But the flood of "It ain't like it used to be!" comments here discount the significant amount of great shows on TV. It's not a great era for comedy, but the hour-long drama has never seen a better time. And cable has not simply allowed for more sex jokes, it has really raised the bar to a degree that most viewers expect writing and production on par with feature films when they're watching TV.And for God's sake, what's wrong with sex jokes? Lighten up. "Two and a Half Men" and "How I Met Your Mother" are terrible shows, but it's not simply because they're not to the network decency standards of 1972, it's because they're poorly written, formulaic, common-denominator sitcoms.

LAprGuy

Lighten up. "Two and a Half Men" and "How I Met Your Mother" are terrible shows, but it's not simply because they're not to the network decency standards of 1972, it's because they're poorly written, formulaic, common-denominator sitcoms.When you call "How I Met Your Mother" a poorly written, formulaic, common-denominator sitcom, you invalidate the rest of your statement.

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About

    Ken Levine is an Emmy winning writer/director/producer/major league baseball announcer. In a career that has spanned over 30 years Ken has worked on MASH, CHEERS, FRASIER, THE SIMPSONS, WINGS, EVERYBODY LOVES RAYMOND, BECKER, DHARMA & GREG, and has co-created his own series including ALMOST PERFECT starring Nancy Travis. He and his partner wrote the feature VOLUNTEERS. Ken has also been the radio/TV play-by-play voice of the Baltimore Orioles, Seattle Mariners, San Diego Padres.
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